spookymrsboo:

British Town is Being Terrorized by an Evil Clown
A spooky clown has been scaring Northampton residents in full costume and make up.
He is red haired and white faced and has appeared in several locations in the Abington and Kingsley areas.
A Facebook page has now been set up for the clown called Spot Northampton’s Clown which has already achieved over 3,000 likes since it went live yesterday.
The clown has proved a sensation on social media and has its own Twitter hashtag #northamptonclown.
According to reports it has knocked on someone’s door and offered to paint their sills despite having no painting equipment.
Let us know if you see it too. Here are some Tweets about the clown so far:
(click here to read tweets)

spookymrsboo:

British Town is Being Terrorized by an Evil Clown

A spooky clown has been scaring Northampton residents in full costume and make up.

He is red haired and white faced and has appeared in several locations in the Abington and Kingsley areas.

A Facebook page has now been set up for the clown called Spot Northampton’s Clown which has already achieved over 3,000 likes since it went live yesterday.

The clown has proved a sensation on social media and has its own Twitter hashtag #northamptonclown.

According to reports it has knocked on someone’s door and offered to paint their sills despite having no painting equipment.

Let us know if you see it too. Here are some Tweets about the clown so far:

(click here to read tweets)

ramirezbundydahmer:

The Brown Lady - Raynham Hall in Norfolk, England, is home to the subject of one of the most famous ghost photos ever captured, the Brown Lady is named so because she appears in a rich brocade brown dress. She is widely believed to be Lady Dorothy Walpole, sister of Sir Robert Walpole, who married Charles, 2nd Viscount Townshend in 1713. She died under mysterious circumstances in 1726, and sightings of her began shortly after. Though reports of sightings have waned dramatically since the photo was taken in 1936, sightings before then had been reported by some fairly reputable sources. My favorite account is from a Major Loftus, who was staying at Raynham Hall in 1849. Retiring to bed one night, he and a friend named Hawkins observed a woman in brown brocade who vanished as Major Loftus approached her. Determined to confront the apparition, the next night he returned to she same spot and saw her again. He was horrified to see however, that when he looked into her face he saw only two black sockets where her eyes should have been. 

ramirezbundydahmer:

The Brown Lady - Raynham Hall in Norfolk, England, is home to the subject of one of the most famous ghost photos ever captured, the Brown Lady is named so because she appears in a rich brocade brown dress. She is widely believed to be Lady Dorothy Walpole, sister of Sir Robert Walpole, who married Charles, 2nd Viscount Townshend in 1713. She died under mysterious circumstances in 1726, and sightings of her began shortly after. Though reports of sightings have waned dramatically since the photo was taken in 1936, sightings before then had been reported by some fairly reputable sources. My favorite account is from a Major Loftus, who was staying at Raynham Hall in 1849. Retiring to bed one night, he and a friend named Hawkins observed a woman in brown brocade who vanished as Major Loftus approached her. Determined to confront the apparition, the next night he returned to she same spot and saw her again. He was horrified to see however, that when he looked into her face he saw only two black sockets where her eyes should have been. 

(via creepylittleworld)

THE PROCTOR HAUNTING

Have you ever spent the night in a house reputed to be haunted? This story could make you reconsider.

It was the autumn of 1834 when the Proctors, a Quaker family, began to notice disturbances in their house near Tyneside in northern England. Every member of the family complained of hearing footsteps and whistling that could not be accounted for. The sound of a clock being wound could not be explained. Over a six-year period, the intensity of the haunting increased. The stomping of angry footsteps echoed throughout the house, contrasted by faint whisperings. And then there were the apparitions. The white figure of a strange woman was seen in a window by a neighbor, and then seen in other rooms of the house by the Proctors. A disembodied white face appeared over a stair railing, seeming to watch the family.

The Proctor’s plight was known throughout the area, and then, as now, there were skeptics who were certain they could explain it all away. On July 3, 1840, Edward Drury, a local doctor, volunteered to spend a night in the house with his colleague, T. Hudson, while the Proctors were away. Dr. Drury armed himself with pistols and waited on the third floor landing, unafraid of what he was sure were mundane house noises. Less than an hour into his vigil, Drury began to hear soft footfalls, then a knocking and an echoing cough. Hudson had fallen asleep. But at about 1 a.m., Dr. Drury watched in horror as a closet door slowly swung open out of which floated toward him the ghostly lady in white. Drury screamed and charged the phantom, succeeding only in tripping over his friend Hudson. What next happened the doctor could not recall. “I have since learned,” he later wrote, “that I was carried downstairs in an agony of fear and terror.”

Some years later the Proctors could stand no more of the unexplained manifestations and vacated the house in 1847. The building was later torn down

(via fuckyeahnightmares)